Family Immigration: The Long Wait To Immigrate. Foundation For American Policy Brief

Family Immigration: The Long Wait To Immigrate. Foundation For American Policy Brief

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Family immigration quotas are inadequate and result in separation and long waits for Americans, lawful permanent residents and close family members. Approximately 4 million people are waiting in family immigration backlogs, according to data obtained from the U.S. Department of State and Department of Homeland Security. The wait time for a U.S. citizen petitioning for a brother or sister from the Philippines exceeds 20 years. A U.S. citizen petitioning for either a married (3rd preference)or unmarried (1st preference) son or daughter (21 years or older) can expect to wait 6 to 17 years, depending on the country or origin. Research shows legal immigrants experience faster wage growth than natives, are more likely to start businesses and have higher median years of schooling. Raising family immigration quotas would serve both the humanitarian and economic interests of the United States. (The research for this paper was funded by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.)
Citation: Anderson, Stuart. Family Immigration: The Long Wait To Immigrate. Policy brief. Arlington, VA: Foundation For American Policy, May 2010. Print.
Program: Democracy