Carnegie Brain Trust: North Korea's Nuclear Test

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(Photo: Jung Yeon-Je/AFP/Getty Images)

Corporation grantees in our nuclear security portfolio respond in the media to today's nuclear test in North Korea.

Melissa Hanham, Center for Nonproliferation Studies​, Middlebury Institute of International Studies:
"It's hard for us to verify their claim. My deep fear is that they will launch a live nuclear weapon on one of their missiles, but that would be extremely dangerous as that could trigger a war."

Watch on CNN

Jeffrey Lewis, Center for Nonproliferation Studies​, Middlebury Institute of International Studies:
“This is clearly a nuclear test,” said Jeffrey Lewis, director of the East Asia nonproliferation program at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies in Monterey, Calif. He estimated the size at between 10 and 20 kilotons. The North’s last nuclear test, carried out in January’, was about six kilotons. 

Read at Washington Post

Kelsey Davenport, Arms Control Association:
“It is likely now that North Korea could at this point put a nuclear warhead on a short- or medium-range missile which could reach South Korea, Japan and US military installations in the region."

Read at The Guardian

Ralph Cossa, The Pacific Forum, Center for Strategic and International Studies:
"We're in no position to control North Korea until the Chinese make it clear they're ready to allow North Korea to fail. The Chinese still haven't been willing to do that." 

Read at Chicago Tribune

Joel Wit, Johns Hopkins University:
"No one should be surprised that North Korea continues to conduct nuclear tests to enhance the capabilities of its growing arsenal. Nor should they expect China to solve this problem for the United States."

Read at First Post

Joel Wit, Johns Hopkins University:
"The next administration must recognize that the United States, not China, is the indispensable nation when it comes to dealing with North Korea"

Read at The New York Times